Tag Archives: home studio

Working Through Lockdown

Although I have continued to work throughout the whole coronavirus pandemic (whilst complying with government guidelines), a lot of my clients have been working from home so shooting on location with them has been tricky. Luckily I have been able to use my home and garden to help out as I previously mentioned.

For that shoot I had to photograph a shoe, comp the shoe on to a stock shot of a leg and then repeat for the dorsi flexed or plantar flexed stages of taking a step during walking – can you tell I don’t know what I’m talking about? Luckily I had some experts from my client on hand to advise!

The image was for the front cover of the latest Halo Medical catalogue, which looks like this thanks to the good folk at Remember Creative:

I also had to shoot a rather large outdoor log burner and the client wanted both studio and location shots, so I had to muscle it single handedly in to my house during the first lockdown. Once I had got it in it was then a case of moving around it rather than moving it around as it weighed 75Kgs, but the client was delighted with the final pictures and I was pleased to get it back out of my house without giving myself a hernia.

The CALBQ studio shot. Photo by Douglas Kurn
The CALBQ shot in my home studio or dining room as Mrs Doug likes to call it!
The CALBQ studio shot. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Photo by Douglas Kurn

Luckily the weather was fantastic for the outdoor shots that I took in my garden and I certainly wasn’t in need of any additional heat from the log burner but I had the power of retouching to help me out with the flames.

A behind the scenes shot in the garden.
Photographing the CALBQ on location in my back garden.
The final CALBQ location product shot.
The final image with added flames.

In between lockdowns I was also asked by Halo Medical to attend their factory in Northants as they have been investing heavily in new technology which they wanted to promote. I had previously been to the factory to create some portraits of the craftsmen who hand made some of the shoes, as well as some reportage shots of them at work which they had made into large canvas prints. It was lovely to see the prints still hanging in their reception area and looking great.

This time though things were a little different: I got zapped by a temperature sensor, had to sign a form to say I hadn’t been to any at risk places, had to use hand sanitiser and wear a face mask to enter the building. I’ve also had to resort to wearing my contact lenses on jobs now as masks make it tricky to see.

Douglas Kurn with steamed up glasses
Not great for a photographer!

There were some really interesting machines doing quite intricate stuff, and it was great to see the way the old hand crafting and the new technology worked together.

Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn
Halo Medical Technology. Photo by Douglas Kurn

If living in lockdown and with the coronavirus pandemic has taught me anything (apart from you can open a screw top bottle with a foil cutter) it is that we need to be resourceful and just get on with it in any way we can.

Oh, and according to Mrs Doug, my home studio is a dining room NOT a permanent feature…

:DK

Lockdown Living Room

What does a location photographer do during a major pandemic lockdown? Shifts some furniture and sets up a studio in the living room, that’s what. I even managed to convince Mrs Doug to be my “willing” assistant and help me move the furniture. “Don’t worry darling, the sun’s shining so we can live in the garden most of the time…” I opined, taking my life in my hands.

My lockdown home studio

Luckily I’ve got previous when it comes to doing shoots from home managing to provide table top photography to some of my clients (that’s photography of things that fit on a table top rather than photos of actual table tops – not that it can’t be done), even managing to incorporate some video in to the jobs.

That’s all relatively straightforward, but now I’ve got to work out a way to tell Mrs Doug that there’s some outdoor barbecue equipment on it’s way and we’ve got to turn the garden in to a photoshoot location…

:DK